Outland Tracker sandals review

In short, DO NOT BUY! AVOID! AVOID! AVOID!

The Good:
Cheap
Comfortable
Adjustable

The Bad:
Flimsy construction

If you wear sandals on a regular basis, these sandals will not last long. I bought a pair at Big 5 Sporting Goods sometime around April, in preparation for a trip in late May. I really appreciated the adjustable back strap compared to the Columbia TechSun sandals that I ususally buy. They were also cheaper than Columbia sandals by about $10. They failed only 4 months later.

I wear sandals daily and I wear them when I drive. With my leg extended to the pedals, the weight of my foot rests against the back strap of the sandals. My issue with Columbia TechSun is that the back strap is too loose, allowing my heel to rub the floor and the edge of the sandal, causing callouses. I loved the Outland Tracker sandals at first because I could adjust the back strap tighter. Unfortunately, it seems the strain of holding the weight of my foot was more than they could bare. The stitching gave out while I was running errands with my wife, only a few hours before a road trip. I spent the next week wearing hot, sweaty Fila Skeletoes shoes with only 1 pair of now-very-stinky toe socks.

If money were no object, I would consider just buying a dozen pairs of Outland Trackers and replacing them whenever they break. However, they are not cheap enough or comfortable enough compared to Columbia TechSun sandals to make me buy a new pair every 4 months. I’ll admit that my Wonderlite dress shoes are comfortable enough to justify buying a new pair whenever they wear out. I think Wonderlites are several steps above all other dress shoes in comfort.

Update: They were recently sold on “closeout” for $20/pair. That’s actually fairly tempting. My new TechSun sandals aren’t nearly as comfortable as my Trackers. I cut the defective ankle strap off, and am still using the Trackers as slip-on sandals for around the house, getting the mail, retrieving items from the car, etc.

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About jurmond

'Jurmond' was the name of my first character in a homebrew D&D campaign. He was a gunslinger and tinker, creating and carrying strange weapons that belched fire and smoke. That was well over a decade ago but I still think of him whenever fiction and firearms collide, so it seems the perfect pen name for this project.
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