Securing Firearms

ROUGH DRAFT WARNING

Firearm safety is not a topic to be take lightly. Unused firearms should probably be kept locked away for several possible reasons. First, anyone with children should be wary. On the other hand, my father kept all of his guns in his bedroom closet, but my brother & I NEVER messed with them without supervision. Second, many pro-gun people own a lot of guns. We need to be wary about thieves. Firearms are very financially dense*, surpassed only by cash & nice jewelry. If someone has a half dozen rifles, each worth $1000 or more, then that’s a lot to lose. Also, we must be aware of the potential for harm if an entire firearm collection moves in to the criminal underground.

However, none of this should be construed as support for legislation requiring firearms to be kept in secured locations. Yes, it seems wise for someone with a $20,000 collection to spend a few thousand on a gun safe. However, it is morally reprehensensible to require every gun owner to spend hundreds or thousands of dollars on a safe, because it will be a barrier to keep new gun owners away.

Moving on, I don’t really know much about safes & firearm security, but these videos should help.

Strong language warning: www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIJFQO4DIxw

TL:DW – Basically, cheap lock boxes suck. Anyone who knows anything about lockpicking or breaking in to boxes will be able to open them in a few moments. They’re only useful for stopping curious toddlers and satisfying overbearing politicians.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltK-bDbADa8

TL:DW – A safe salesman walks through his shopping, talking about the features of good safe vs cheap safes, and some of the deceptive ways safes are built & marketed.

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*financial density is a concept of mine. It represents the size/weight of an item compared to it’s value. For example, a $700 handgun that weighs 2 pounds and fits in a pocket has a higher financial density than a $700 42″ plasma tv that takes 2 people to move.

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About jurmond

'Jurmond' was the name of my first character in a homebrew D&D campaign. He was a gunslinger and tinker, creating and carrying strange weapons that belched fire and smoke. That was well over a decade ago but I still think of him whenever fiction and firearms collide, so it seems the perfect pen name for this project.
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