Firearm Faux Pas of Hollywood Pt 1

Hollywood and the entertainment industry makes a lot of mistakes regarding firearms. Here’s a list of top mistakes:

  • calling a magazine a ‘clip’
  • guns that never need to reload, especially shotguns and anything full-auto
  • impossibly good accuracy from handguns
  • lasers on sniper rifles
  • whisper quiet silencers” (sound suppressors)
  • dumb suppressors that don’t work – empty soda bottles, or even a potato
  • easy access to full-auto
  • guns easily converted to full-auto
  • shooting full-auto with one hand
  • shooting rifles from the hip – there’s a reason they have a shoulder stock!

One of the most noticable, pervasive mistakes is actually a simple sound used for emphasis. Seriously, start listening closely. Hollywood seems to believe that guns make a loud ‘click-clack’ every time it is lifted, pointed, or carried around a corner.

Recently, I’ve spotted TWO separate occaisons in TWD where AR-15 type rifles have been shown missing their rear sight. Why would a rifle ever be missing the rear sight? These rifles didn’t appear damaged or badly maintained. It’s just a simple case of some Prop Master using a rifle straight out of the box without giving it a close look.

However, I saw a new worst-case earlier today on an episode of Numb3rs.

backwards magazine in HK MP-5

In case you’re not a gun-nut, that ‘bananna clip’ is in backwards! It should curve forward. Basially, it’s a long, narrow box that holds the ammunition. They curve forward because ammunition is smaller at the front than at the back, so ammo naturally creates a curve when stacked up together. Anyone who’s familiar with rilfles knows how to load one.

I’m not sure which is worse: that one person made this mistake, or that many people on the set failed to notice.

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About jurmond

'Jurmond' was the name of my first character in a homebrew D&D campaign. He was a gunslinger and tinker, creating and carrying strange weapons that belched fire and smoke. That was well over a decade ago but I still think of him whenever fiction and firearms collide, so it seems the perfect pen name for this project.
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